George England Organ case
George England organ case, in Dulwich, London, restored by Laurent Robert Woodcarver

Restoration of George England pipe organ case with carvings at Christ's Chapel of Alleyn's College of God's Gift in Dulwich.

George England organ case restored by Laurent Robert Woodcarver, frieze 3
George England organ case restored by Laurent Robert Woodcarver, frieze 2

Carved frieze-work

George England organ case restored by Laurent Robert Woodcarver, frieze 1
George England organ case restored by Laurent Robert Woodcarver, frieze 4

Middle section of the case with the restored frieze-work mounted onto new building frame

George England organ case restored by Laurent Robert Woodcarver, frieze and building frame

Carvings to flats with C scrolled acanthus and garlands of flowers

George England organ case restored by Laurent Robert Woodcarver, ogee shaped panel with pipe shades carvings
George England organ case restored by Laurent Robert Woodcarver, ogee shaped panel with c scrolled acanthus carvings

Bass and treble pediment towers

George England organ case restored by Laurent Robert Woodcarver, pediment carvings

Cresting carvings

George England organ case restored by Laurent Robert Woodcarver, carved crestings

 

George England (organ builder, also Richard Bridge's son-in-law) built this organ in 1760.

It is a rare example of early Gothic revival style organ case design. The case with its Gothic proportions elevates to three spires (flèches) pinacles ending with flames for the bass and treble towers and a carved pineapple for the middle. Six uprights from the facade are finishing with smaller spires to their very top. Between the uprights and above the pipes are the pipe shades outlined by ogival style arcs and fretwork. Bass and treble towers are linked by two curved rails ending at two "aileron" or corbel flanked against the central tower imposts.

 George England seemed to have introduced, in this case, a lively and elegant ornamentation in common use in his day such as the wild roses foliage growing vigorously throughout the spires and pipe shades, in convergence with the upper part of the case.

The flats are decorated with fine applied C scrolled acanthuses " en applique"  in fashion of the 18 th century. At eye level one can admire the middle-section,  beautified by a long frieze running across the entirety of the facade,  ''guirlande de fleur'' or garland of flowers are below the flats, below the towers are c scrolls acanthuses "with crêtes de coq", two door panels with their top rail in ogee or "en accolade"are placed under the bass and treble tower displaying spectacular oak  medullary rays figures.  The frieze work placed above the console is embellished by alternating fluting, "grain d'orges" and acanthus leaves.

The organ case and carvings are of quarter sawn oak, I used  Victorian period wainscoting oak panels to match and carve the missing elements. I have lengthen the middle tower including the aileron or consoles ( the organ builders could rebuilt the original length to the pipes), I made three new spires with their tracery and completed the lower bass and treble side paneling.  The console area was reconstructed  by the organ builders.

drawing of acanthus leaves, Laurent Robert woodcarving
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